Today: March 05, 2024
Today: March 05, 2024

A US citizen has been arrested in Moscow on drug charges

Share This
A US citizen has been arrested in Moscow on drug charges
AP
AP
January 09, 2024

MOSCOW (AP) — A U.S. citizen has been arrested on drug charges in Russia, officials said Tuesday, a move that comes amid soaring Russia-U.S. tensions over Ukraine.

The arrest of Robert Woodland Romanov was reported by the press service of the Moscow courts. It said the Ostankino District Court ruled on Saturday to keep him in custody for two months on charges of preparing to get involved in illegal drug trafficking pending an official investigation. It didn't offer any details of the accusations.

The U.S. State Department said it was aware of reports of the recent detention of a U.S. citizen and noted that it “has no greater priority than the safety and security of U.S. citizens overseas,” but refrained from further comment, citing privacy considerations. The U.S. Embassy in Moscow issued a similar statement.

Russian media noted that the name of the accused matches that of a U.S. citizen interviewed by the popular daily Komsomolskaya Pravda in 2020.

In the interview, the man said that he was born in the Perm region in the Ural Mountains in 1991 and adopted by an American couple when he was two. He said that he traveled to Russia to find his Russian mother and eventually met her in a TV show in Moscow.

The man told Komsomolskaya Pravda that he liked living in Russia and decided to move there. The newspaper reported that he settled in the town of Dolgoprudny just outside Moscow and was working as an English teacher at a local school.

The news about the arrest come as Washington has sought to win the release of jailed Americans Paul Whelan and Evan Gershkovich. The State Department said last month that it had put multiple offers on the table, but they had been rejected by the Russian government.

Gershkovich, a Wall Street Journal reporter, was detained in March while on a reporting trip to the Russian city of Yekaterinburg, about 2,000 kilometers (1,200 miles) east of Moscow. He has remained behind bars ever since on espionage accusations that he and the Journal have denied. The U.S. government has declared him to be wrongfully detained.

Whelan, a corporate security executive from Michigan, has been jailed in Russia since his December 2018 arrest on espionage-related charges that both he and the U.S. government dispute. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison.

Analysts have pointed out that Moscow could be using jailed Americans as bargaining chips amid U.S.-Russian tensions that soared when Russia sent troops into Ukraine. At least two U.S. citizens arrested in Russia in recent years — including WNBA star Brittney Griner — have been exchanged for Russians jailed in the U.S.

Popular

What you should know from the opening of China's legislature

China’s Premier Li Qiang promoted an image of confidence as he announced modest economic growth goals for the country at one of its most important political gatherings

US Navy says USS John Finn conducted routine south-to-north Taiwan Strait transit

BEIJING (Reuters) - The Arleigh-Burke guided missile class destroyer USS John Finn conducted a routine south-to-north Taiwan Strait transit on March 5, the U.S. Navy said in a statement on Tuesday.

Analysis-Chinese developers resume UK commercial property retreat

By Iain Withers and Marc Jones LONDON (Reuters) - Some big Chinese developers are set to offload more real estate in Britain to raise cash, property agents say, making the most of a slowly thawing

Blackrock sees India, Indonesia as promising for investment opportunities

JAKARTA (Reuters) - U.S. investment firm BlackRock sees India and Indonesia as two Asia-Pacific countries offering a lot of investment opportunities, its head of research for the region said on

Cryptoverse: Asian traders give bitcoin blast-off

By Jihoon Lee and Jaspreet Kalra SEOUL/MUMBAI (Reuters) - Bitcoin's runaway rally is being driven by investors in Asia.

Analysis-Boeing's Spirit Aero bid could help supply chain but is no cure-all

By Allison Lampert and Abhijith Ganapavaram (Reuters) - Boeing's possible takeover of Spirit AeroSystems, along with delaying plans to ramp up production of 737 MAX jets, could help the planemaker

Related

Thousands of Korean doctors face license suspensions as Seoul moves to prosecute strike leaders

Thousands of striking junior doctors in South Korea are facing proceedings to suspend their medical licenses Tuesday

AI pervades everyday life with almost no oversight. States scramble to catch up

Lawmakers in at least seven states are taking big legislative swings to regulate bias in artificial intelligence

Alabama lawmakers aim to approve immunity laws for IVF providers

Alabama lawmakers, who face public pressure to get in vitro fertilization services restarted, are nearing approval of immunity legislation for providers

North Korea threatens to take military moves in response to US-South Korean drills

North Korea has called the ongoing South Korean-U.S. military drills a plot to invade the country, as it threatens to take unspecified “responsible” military steps in response

- Advertisement -
Advertisement: Limited Time Offer