Today: May 24, 2024
Today: May 24, 2024

How this former burglar cased neighborhood will disturb you

Share This
LA Post: How this former burglar cased neighborhood will disturb you
January 31, 2024
Harlow Calloway - LA Post

Jennifer Gomez spent nearly ten years in a Florida prison for repeatedly targeting homes in burglary sprees. Now reformed, she candidly shares her past methods on TikTok, hoping to help homeowners better secure their properties.

"I'm just telling you guys what my life was like because maybe it'll help somebody," Gomez explained in a video that has drawn almost 2 million views.

Gomez would start by checking the weather, preferring rainy days that kept people indoors. "The nastier it was, the better off I was," she admitted. Sunny days led her to more isolated houses with fewer eyewitnesses. She knew most people left between 8-11 a.m., returning home sporadically later. Consequently, she started stalking as early as 5:30 a.m., using the morning hours as prime time.

Surprisingly, home security systems didn't deter Gomez. To her, they signaled valuables inside worth targeting. Years ago, in Florida, many systems were plagued by false alarms. After multiple mistakes, the police responded less urgently. From triggering an alarm, Gomez estimated 10-15 minutes before officers might arrive—enough time to grab valuables. Today's video doorbells like Ring deter more break-ins.

Gomez came equipped with glass-cutting tools to slice through windows and screens for entry access. She says she'd aim for low windows reachable on foot. Signs of pets hinted at disabled security sensors letting animals roam free. As an extra precaution, Gomez wore oversized shoes to confuse footprint tracing and tied back her hair to avoid leaving traces. She dressed professionally in scrubs to blend into neighborhoods as a healthcare worker.

Gomez focused on mansions of the "real upper class," believing they had ample means to replace stolen goods easily through insurance. She avoided sentimental heirlooms but admits no moral high ground for past actions.

Despite remorse over her history, Gomez doesn't glorify her criminal record. By candidly sharing her methods, she hopes to enlighten people on the risks facing households today. Her insights on criminal psychology provide homeowners with important context for better security.

Gomez's experiences offer all homeowners valuable perspectives in protecting spaces from intrusion. Most burglars continue entering homes through low windows and doors, avoiding higher windows requiring ladders. Ensuring these easily accessible areas have quality locks, alarms, lighting, and even thorny bushes below windows significantly deters break-in attempts.

Burglars typically target isolated homes that appear unoccupied and empty. Make your home look lived-in with lights, radio sounds, and closed curtains. Ask neighbors to collect mail and packages routinely. Extra lights with motion sensors also discourage prowlers at night.

Many burglaries occur during weather-keeping people's homes or on sunny days and weekends with residents away. Adjust home alarm settings and make unoccupied homes appear lived-in during high-risk weather. Smart lighting timers, radios, and television ambient noise help considerably.

Potential prowlers may observe morning routines over time. Occasionally altering departure schedules, random light changes, and moving blinds sporadically, even when absent, remains compelling. Varying daily patterns regularly keep criminals uncertain.

Trust your instincts and notify authorities if anyone makes you uncomfortable loitering near or watching your home. Carefully note distinguishing details of people and vehicles involved to provide officials. Speaking up protects the community.

Home burglaries create immense unease and vulnerability at one's most secure sanctuary. But understanding risks, psychology, and deterrents allows for properly securing our spaces, possessions, and peace of mind. With intelligent prevention measures, we guard what matters against invasion.

Jennifer Gomez understands this psychology all too well, trying now to prevent harm to others. While she can't erase her past, she hopes her painful honesty steers those willing to listen toward better caution and safety. She doesn't defend her previous lifestyle but uses hard lessons to potentially spare victims today.

"What prompted me to share this information is that people don't understand the way of thinking when you are going to rob someone's house. It's almost like it's a game. I'm smarter than you," Gomez said in Inside Edition.

 "And it gives you a horrible rush."

This troubling rush fuels addiction for the quick reward. Gomez got hooked early, learning from family members engaged in similar crimes. She fell into relationships with partners like an ex-boyfriend, who was also deeply entrenched in this world. After he fled authorities internationally, extra charges compounded against Gomez.

"It's straightforward to get into," Gomez told Newsweek. "It's not hard. That's what I want people to know."

The ease tempted Gomez to live outside the law despite knowing better. She had enrolled in nursing courses beforehand. But the temptation persisted.

"I was making perfect money at a very young age. So once you get a taste of that, for some people, it's tough to get out," she admitted.

This hunger for material goods overrides conscience and common sense. Such craving leads burglars like Gomez down misguided roads. She gave in for years, up until arrests and incarceration finally intervened.

Behind bars, she carried deep shame. "I hated myself," Gomez told NBC Dateline. "I had brought so much embarrassment to my family."

She resolved to pay her debt to society and transform herself. She gave birth to her son while imprisoned. Motherhood strengthened her determination to walk the straight line upon release.

Gomez now designs TikToks and YouTube videos to steer others from her mistakes. She responds to thousands of questions and comments, offering specific tips daily. Followers thank her for transparency and for empowering them against invasion.

"I appreciate you sharing your story to spread awareness. I know it probably isn't easy opening up about your past like this, but it shows growth," posted one user.

"As a victim of robbery, this insight is constructive. Understanding motives allows us to protect ourselves better. Thank you for sharing," wrote another follower.

Gomez receives criticism, too, but challenges snap judgments. "How about applauding that maybe I can stop one more girl from making the same horrible mistakes I made," she responded once.

Critics argue Gomez appears to relish her notoriety. But she clarifies her work as restitution, protecting rather than endangering. She references guilt as motivation, not pride.

Gomez also counters accusations of revealing trade secrets. "Any person with Google can find 100 ways to break into a house better than I did 15 years ago," she contested.

Frustrated followers still condemn her platform as instructional for copycats. Gomez stresses raising red flags so people take action.

"If knowing this information helps people protect themselves better, then so be it. I can't control what others do, only myself," she said.

Gomez explains her candid style resonates with young viewers. They respond to real talk from someone walking the walk. She earns trust by admitting hard truths with no filter. And the next generation listens closely to better choices.

"I'm very blunt and don't sugarcoat things. I tell them straight up this is not the life you want to live," said Gomez.

Through her profile, Gomez demonstrates change is possible with perseverance. She gives hope that even after hitting rock bottom, fulfilling alternatives exist. Her most tremendous success is showing life pivoting the other way.

"It doesn't matter where you start in life," shared Gomez. "What matters is where you end up and what you learned along the way."

Gomez is an uncommon role model for those with troubled histories: a flawed former offender turned force for good. She proves self-improvement can redeem anyone willing to share wisdom learned through hardship truthfully. Her unconventional journey makes that bumpy road back a little smoother for those who follow.

Popular

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin to undergo procedure at Walter Reed, will transfer power to deputy

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin will undergo a medical procedure Friday at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center and will transfer power temporarily

Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin to undergo procedure at Walter Reed, will transfer power to deputy

Singapore says investigators have data for flight hit by turbulence

Singapore investigators examining flight SQ321 that was hit by severe turbulence have obtained data from the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder, Singapore Transport

Singapore says investigators have data for flight hit by turbulence

Kabosu, the face of cryptocurrency Dogecoin, dies at 18, owner says

Kabosu, the Japanese dog that became a global meme and the face of alternative cryptocurrency Dogecoin has died at 18, her owner announced in a blog post on Friday.

Kabosu, the face of cryptocurrency Dogecoin, dies at 18, owner says

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who skewered fast food industry, dies at 53

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, an Oscar nominee whose most famous works skewered America’s food industry and who notably ate only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died of cancer

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who skewered fast food industry, dies at 53

Related

UAW files objection to Mercedes vote, accuses company of intimidating workers

UAW files objection to Mercedes vote, accuses company of intimidating workers

Efforts to draft a pandemic treaty falter as countries disagree on how to respond to next emergency

Efforts to draft a pandemic treaty falter as countries disagree on how to respond to next emergency

6 killed in Idaho crash were agricultural workers from Mexico, officials say

6 killed in Idaho crash were agricultural workers from Mexico, officials say

Citadel's Griffin wants to know Trump's running mate before deciding to donate

Citadel's Griffin wants to know Trump's running mate before deciding to donate
- Advertisement -
Advertisement: Limited Time Offer