Today: May 24, 2024
Today: May 24, 2024

National survey reveals 1 in 3 parents now opt for "sleepunders over sleepovers"

Share This
LA Post: National survey reveals 1 in 3 parents now opt for
March 20, 2024
Natasha Dixon - LA Post

As social values change, so do the ways parents raise their children. There is a new trend among kids that goes against the traditional thought of sleepovers. The "sleepunder" or "lateover" is becoming more popular among parents all over the country. They choose to pick up their kids before bedtime instead of letting them stay the night at a friend's house.

This departure from the classic sleepover experience raises questions about the underlying motivations driving this shift. According to psychological experts, the rise of sleepunders is rooted in a deep concern for children's safety and well-being.

Renowned psychoanalyst and parenting expert Erica Komisar, who lives in New York, shines light on this trend. She says that the practice of sleepunders isn't always a sign of overprotective parenting, but rather of being aware of each child's specific wants and feelings.

"While some kids can navigate sleepovers without hesitation, others may find the change in routine unsettling," Komisar explains. "Sleepunders or lateovers offer a valuable compromise, particularly for younger children, those with separation anxiety, or those who struggle with transitions related to sleep."

The decision to opt for sleepunders is often born out of a parent's innate desire to safeguard their children from potential harm in unfamiliar environments. Nicholette Leanza, a psychotherapist at LifeStance Health in Beechwood, Ohio, highlights this concern. "The fear that a child may be exposed to guns in the home or become a victim of sexual abuse is enough to make any parent uneasy about allowing their child to spend the night elsewhere," she says.

Neha J., a mother from New York, exemplifies this sentiment. She and her spouse have a strict policy against traditional sleepovers for their 9-year-old daughter. "It's something we've grown up with as well," she confides. "We're not comfortable with our daughter going for sleepovers." Instead, they typically pick up their daughter around 11 p.m. or at the latest hour permitted by the host family, allowing her to experience the social aspect without the overnight stay.

While the sleepunder trend may alleviate parental anxieties, experts acknowledge that it can impact children in varying ways. Leanza notes, "Some kids may prefer sleeping in their own beds, so they don't mind being picked up without spending the night. However, others may feel embarrassed or different from their peers for not being allowed to participate in the full sleepover experience."

Neha J. has encountered such pushback from her daughter on occasion, as she has grown older. "This arrangement sometimes disappoints her," she admits. "We explain that while we understand her desire to stay with friends, as parents, we feel more comfortable having her at home for the night, especially when we aren't well-acquainted with the other child's family."

At the core of the sleepunder trend lies a deep-seated parental instinct to protect one's offspring, even at the risk of temporary disappointment. As Neha J. explains, "We believe children are most vulnerable when asleep, and by bringing her home, we eliminate even the slightest possibility of harm or discomfort that might occur in an unfamiliar environment."

However, experts suggest that sleepunders could serve as a transitional phase, a trial run for eventual full-fledged sleepovers. Leanza recommends starting with allowing kids to sleep over at the homes of trusted relatives or loved ones before gradually expanding to the homes of friends or classmates after thorough vetting and conversation with the other parents about potential safety concerns.

"My advice would be for parents to be cautious but not overprotective," Leanza advises. "We all want to protect our children, but we also don't want to smother them. It's all about striking a balance."

As the sleepunder trend continues to gain traction, it represents a delicate dance between parental protectiveness and fostering independence in children. While some may view it as a departure from cherished childhood traditions, others embrace it as a thoughtful compromise, ensuring their little ones feel secure while still experiencing the joys of socializing with friends. Only time will tell whether sleepunders become a widely accepted norm or a fleeting phase in the ever-shifting sands of parenthood. Nonetheless, it serves as a poignant reminder that the well-being and safety of children will forever be the paramount concern for the vast majority of parents, even if it means redefining long-held customs along the way.

Popular

Singapore says investigators have data for flight hit by turbulence

Singapore investigators examining flight SQ321 that was hit by severe turbulence have obtained data from the cockpit voice recorder and flight data recorder, Singapore Transport

Singapore says investigators have data for flight hit by turbulence

Kabosu, the face of cryptocurrency Dogecoin, dies at 18, owner says

Kabosu, the Japanese dog that became a global meme and the face of alternative cryptocurrency Dogecoin has died at 18, her owner announced in a blog post on Friday.

Kabosu, the face of cryptocurrency Dogecoin, dies at 18, owner says

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who skewered fast food industry, dies at 53

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, an Oscar nominee whose most famous works skewered America’s food industry and who notably ate only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died of cancer

Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who skewered fast food industry, dies at 53

New lawsuit accuses Sean 'Diddy' Combs of sexually abusing college student in the 1990s

A woman who says Sean “Diddy” Combs subjected her to violence and abuse over several years in the 1990s has filed a lawsuit in New York accusing the rapper of sexual assault, battery and gender-motivated violence

New lawsuit accuses Sean 'Diddy' Combs of sexually abusing college student in the 1990s

Related

Louisiana set to reclassify abortion pills as controlled, dangerous substances − here’s what that means

Louisiana set to reclassify abortion pills as controlled, dangerous substances − here’s what that means

Lawsuit seeks to block Washington parental rights law that critics call a 'forced outing' measure

Lawsuit seeks to block Washington parental rights law that critics call a 'forced outing' measure

Efforts to draft a pandemic treaty falter as countries disagree on how to respond to next emergency

Efforts to draft a pandemic treaty falter as countries disagree on how to respond to next emergency

Indonesia's death toll rises to 67 from Sumatra floods, 20 still missing

Indonesia's death toll rises to 67 from Sumatra floods, 20 still missing
- Advertisement -
Advertisement: Limited Time Offer